Posts tagged “Boston

Recovering Boston’s History in the App Age

Posted on June 6, 2012

The NPS Boston mobile app recently debuted on iPad, iPhone, and Android, placing the experience of the Boston National Historical Park and Boston African American National Historic Site in your hands. As the Boston Herald reported on May 24th, the app creates a virtual park ranger to guide tourists from the new National Park Service visitors center through the Freedom Trail and Black Heritage Trail in the Hub, as Boston’s downtown is known. With the opening of the new visitors center, Faneuil Hall (built 1742) and adjacent Quincy Market (built 1824-26) have been marshaled once more into the service of conveying early American history, much as developer James Rouse drew upon colonial and Revolutionary American historical associations when crafting Faneuil Hall Marketplace, an upscale, locally oriented shopping experience,…

Marketing Marketing

Posted on May 19, 2012

Public markets are all the rage these days. After largely disappearing in most communities in the second half of the 20th century amid the rush to supermarkets and processed foods, only a small number of markets remained. Some of the oldest markets that were housed in large, historic buildings in tourist-favored cities phased out their original functions and began to cater to out-of-towners with colorful shops and restaurants. The most notable successful conversion story was in Boston where, as American Tourism co-editor Nicholas Dagen Bloom writes, visionary mall developer James Rouse managed to use the trappings of an old market to reinvent the worn-down Quincy Market into Faneuil Hall Marketplace. For the next two decades other cities rushed to copy Rouse’s brash confidence in…

Rethinking the Wharf’s Edge

Posted on April 26, 2012

Just 27 years after it opened with much hoopla, New York’s South Street Seaport is on the rocks. As David W. Dunlap of the New York Times reported last week, the onetime popular “festival marketplace” was well suited to New York City in the 1970s-80s. At a time when its dockland areas, like much of the city (even Times Square), presented the specter of crime and dinginess, successful attractions like South Street Seaport created insular realms that nevertheless appeared to connect organically with the city’s maritime heritage at wharf’s edge. The festival marketplace concept repackaged abandoned or underutilized structures like public markets, factories, and wharf sheds as tourist-oriented shopping, dining, and entertainment venues. Popularized by the James Rouse Company’s Faneuil Hall Marketplace in Boston in 1976,…

Bostonizing San Antonio

Posted on April 23, 2012

Imagine thousands of millennials taking their places alongside tourists and conventioneers on the famed San Antonio River Walk. On March 22nd, we called attention to San Antonio’s new tourism-marketing strategy “San Antonio Stories,” which aims to attract the creative class to the Texas city with promises of seeing (and hopefully joining) an artistic and inventive beehive. Last week, My San Antonio (the San Antonio Express-News online) reported the results of a city-commissioned study as part of SA2020, a blueprint for how a city best known for the Alamo and the River Walk might look eight years from now. Much of SA2020 focuses on improving many facets of residential life in a city that has in recent years begun to address its longtime dependence on tourism and the military for a…