Living history is woven tightly into the fabric of American tourism. Places stage culture for the visiting public, often donning costumes and sometimes “getting into character.” Yet tourists have always sought more than spectacle, choosing participatory travel experiences whenever possible. Literature, film, and television stimulate travelers to seek out places associated with fiction, and here, too, tourists like to immerse themselves in imaginary place. Highlighting a North Carolina tour company that builds upon the current zeal for the post-apocalyptic film The Hunger Games, a recent Reuters article explores the popularity of literary and Hollywood tourism, pointing to the increasingly sophisticated packaging of experiences that let the consumer walk in a character’s shoes. Almost a decade ago, the late historian Jim Weeks argued in Gettysburg: Memory, Market,…